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The Tennessee Teaching and Certification Resource

Tennessee recently changed its requirements for educator licensure. If you began a teacher preparation program prior to September 1, 2015, you should check with your program coordinator to see how these changes may impact your licensure plan. The certification process is overseen by the Office of Educator Licensing within the state’s Department of Education and is outlined in detail below to help you learn how to become a teacher in Tennessee.

How to Become a Teacher in Tennessee

Tennessee uses a tiered licensure system for educators. To be eligible for an initial Practitioner license, the entry-level certificate in the tiered system, candidates must hold a bachelor’s degree and complete an approved Tennessee teacher preparation program. Those who have not yet completed a teacher preparation program but who do hold a bachelor’s degree may find Tennessee’s alternative teacher certification pathways a good fit.

Once a candidate has completed a bachelor’s degree and teacher preparation program, which must include clinical (in-classroom) experience, the candidate must take the state assessments for educators.

The initial Practitioner license is valid for three years and may be renewed once (up to a maximum of six years). While teaching with a Practitioner license, candidates must attend continuing education to earn Professional Development Points (PDPs). 30 PDPs and three years of teaching experience are required to advance to the next tier of licensure, the Professional license. A minimum of 60 PDPs are required to renew a teaching license. You can read more about this structure and how points are calculated through the Tennessee Department of Education.

Quick Guide

Finding Approved Teacher Education Programs in Tennessee

Projected Job Growth

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Growth in Teaching Jobs in TN through 202215

Candidates for teaching certificates in Tennessee should confirm that their chosen teacher preparation program is provided by an approved school. The Tennessee Department of Education provides a list of approved educator preparation programs based on school and program type. It is also important to note that those attending school out-of-state or online who complete clinical practice or internships in a Tennessee K-12 school district must ensure that their program completes a Partnership Agreement with the district. If this is not done, the experience may not qualify the candidate for licensure.

Tennessee will not issue teaching certificates to out-of-state or online school graduates unless applicants can prove that they have completed a program at an accredited institution. There are six regional accreditation agencies, which are overseen by the US Department of Education, that accredit schools in the US. Therefore, applicants should first confirm this regional accreditation before committing to a program. Any school that offers online teaching certification programs should also be certified by its corresponding regional accreditation agency.

Additionally, there is a national accreditation organization that most states look to as a marker of high quality in teacher education sector. The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) is the result of the merger of two former accreditation agencies, the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). CAEP accreditation is held out as an indication of rigorous standards in the teacher education field.

See our list of CAEP accredited schools in Tennessee.

Tennessee Teacher Outlook
According to the Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development, Tennessee will have 1,190 average annual job openings for elementary school teachers, 490 average annual job openings for middle school teachers, and 700 average annual job openings for secondary school teachers through 2022.2 The US Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that there are about 59,690 elementary, middle, and secondary school teachers in Tennessee.3 Within the state, elementary school teachers earn an average annual salary of $48,970, middle school teachers earn an average annual salary of $49,250, and secondary school teachers earn an average annual salary of $49,870.3 For updates on policy changes and local employment opportunities, visit the Tennessee Education Association, an affiliate of the National Education Association.

Tennessee Teacher Education Requirements

In order to earn Tennessee teaching certification, a prospective teacher must have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher learning and complete a teacher preparation program approved by the Tennessee Department of Education. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree who have not participated in a Tennessee teacher certification program may qualify for an alternative pathway to licensure. To read more about alternative pathways, see our guide to alternative teacher certification in Tennessee.

Tennessee Teacher Testing Requirements

Tennessee State SealThe state of Tennessee requires that all applicants for initial instructional certification achieve passing scores on the Praxis II: Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) and Core Academic Skills for Educators exams, as well as the Praxis II: Subject Assessments/Specialty Area tests appropriate to the subject(s) and grade level(s) to be taught. Note that teacher preparation programs will not recommend a candidate for a license to the Board of Education before these exams are successfully passed. You can determine which tests are applicable to your endorsement area(s) through the Praxis website.

Additional Tennessee Teacher Certification Requirements

All applicants applying for a Tennessee educator certificate must submit fingerprints and undergo a state and federal criminal background check before they can be issued a teaching license. The process can be started by registering for a fingerprinting card through the Tennessee Department of Health.

Tennessee Teachers Licensing Application Process

Once all of the steps towards teaching certification in Tennessee are completed, the candidate is eligible for a license. Different from most other states, in Tennessee the teacher preparation program that a candidate attends applies for the appropriate teaching license on behalf of the candidate. Candidates should not submit their own applications unless specifically instructed. Visit the state’s Department of Education for further details on Tennessee teacher licensing.

Teacher Quote: “I love the enthusiasm and curiosity of second and third graders. Most of my students still believe they can do anything they want to do, so all I have to do is build on their certainty!” -Mary Pitner, Tennessee Second and Third Grade Teacher

Tennessee Teacher Salary and Jobs

Type Number Employed Average Annual Salary
Preschool Teachers 7,580 $29,830
Preschool Teachers, Special Education Not available Not available
Kindergarten Teachers 3,780 $49,310
Elementary School Teachers 29,410 $48,970
Special Education Teachers, Kindergarten and Elementary School 5,380 $48,710
Middle School Teachers 5,680 $51,100
Middle School Teachers, Special Education 920 $52,580
Secondary School Teachers 8,600 $57,610
Secondary School Teachers, Special Education 2,180 $49,450
Secondary School Teachers, Career/Technical Education 2,690 $47,670

Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics as of May 2014.

Tennessee Teacher Interviews

Interview with Dana Lester, Tennessee First Grade Teacher

Interview with Mary Pitner, Tennessee Second and Third Grade Teacher

Frequently Asked Questions about Becoming a Teacher in Tennessee

Question: What are the requirements to obtain a transitional license for teaching in Memphis city schools?

Answer: As of September 1, 2015, the transitional license is no longer issued in the state of Tennessee. Candidates interested in transitioning to teaching should review available teacher preparation programs.

Question: How can I become a substitute teacher in Tennessee?

Answer: To become a substitute teacher in Tennessee, you must apply with individual districts. Each district sets its own requirements for substitutes. Generally, candidates must have professional references and at least 60 credit hours of education from an accredited college or university. Other school districts may require a bachelor’s degree or teacher licensure.

Teaching and Education Programs

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References:
1. Tennessee Department of Education: http://www.tn.gov/education/
2. Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development: https://www.jobs4tn.gov/vosnet/Default.aspx
3. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 State Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates, Tennessee: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_tn.htm
4. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Elementary School Teachers: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252021.htm
5. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Middle School Teachers: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252022.htm
6. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Secondary School Teachers: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252031.htm
7. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Preschool Teachers: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252011.htm
8. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Special Education Teachers, Preschool: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252051.htm
9. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Kindergarten Teachers: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252012.htm
10. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Special Education Teachers, Kindergarten and Elementary School: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252052.htm
11. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Special Education Teachers, Middle School: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252053.htm
12. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Career/Technical Education Teachers, Middle School: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252023.htm
13. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Special Education Teachers, Secondary School: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252054.htm
14. US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2014 Occupational Employment and Wages, Career/Technical Education Teachers, Secondary School: http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes252032.htm
15. Projections Central, Long Term Occupational Projections: http://www.projectionscentral.com/Projections/LongTerm